Date: June 22, 2010

Author: JT

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What I’ve Read Lately: Use Your Head to Get Your Foot in the Door

“Use Your Head to Get Your Foot in the Door”secrets_cover2[1]
by: Harvey Mackay
ISBN: 978-1-59184-321-4

Yes, this is a ‘job search’ book, written by one of our nation’s (U.S.) best business authors: Harvey Mackay.  And, there’s one thing in particular that sets this job search book apart from the others: Mr. Mackay’s desire to help others, to help you, is very apparent.  Yes, he offers some very good suggestions for the over 14,000,000 people currently looking for work.  The content alone is worth the read.  But it is his desire to truly help that puts it over the top.

This ~330 page book is his latest.  It took me longer to read than most business books—and it’s his own fault!  Throughout the body of the book there are a number of other authors and their own books that he cites with recommendations to read.  And, I did.  Matter of fact, I read two other books he recommended, before coming back each time to continue where I left off in his book.

For instance, he spends time discussing the critical need for people to do research now, more than ever.  With so many people vying for the same exact job you’re after, a few minutes googling a company or browsing their website is insufficient.

The solution? Formal research using all the tools, particularly internet oriented, that are available to you.  He introduces his readers to Sam Richter’s Take the Cold Out of Cold Calling: Web Search Secrets.  Sam’s book itself is a treasure trove of valuable information—which I’m also glad I read.

Mr. Mackay’s perspective is fairly unique in the market of job search books…at least that I’ve come across.  He is actually a CEO making hiring and firing decisions.  His views, and advice, are based on 40 years of staffing decisions.  Unlike others than lean toward pontificating, his is real, sound, and worth paying attention to.  It’s not often the boss tells you the way it is, even if only from his or her perspective.

Whether it’s recovering from the shock of having to look; preparing for interview questions; negotiating for the new position; networking; or, asking for a raise, he’s covered all the bases.  And, what’s nice, many of the examples used are as recent as 2008/9.

Throughout the book, typically at the end of each chapter, there is a Mackay’s Moral. Most germane to this posting: “You’ll never pass the test without doing the homework.” Your homework: Get the book, read it, and take to heart the elements important to you.

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