Date: November 9, 2010

Author: JT

Tags: , , , , , , ,

3 Comments »

Why Do B2B Branding?

Came across this article in a UK blog, B2B Branding—Why build a brand?  The core premise is that business leaders see the process as an expense, dismissing ‘branding’ as this thing that B2C (business to consumer) companies do.

Really?

Hmm.  I might suggest a look at Seth Godin’s Purple Cow (do something different, remarkable, memorable).  Then, watch his :17 presentation at TED, and then remind them: it may be B2B but people still sell to people. B2B is B2C, just the pockets are deeper.

It has never ceased to amaze me how ‘business people’ have such a hard time understanding ‘the consumer’ at times.  After all, we are all consumers, we are all time challenged, we are all humans, and we all want to feel like ‘we’ are important.  Having said all that, we watch out for things that are interesting to each of us individually and then pay attention once we’ve found it.  Well, at least for a little while.  And, isn’t that what it’s all about?

Now, why do we want to do B2B branding?

3 Responses to “Why Do B2B Branding?”

  • Deb November 9, 2010 at 3:43 pm

    Ahem (attention) and Ah-men JT. As a person who works with organizations, the orgs. themselves take on personas, a culture (many time persistent, intractible, connected to founder values) that is often the secret sauce hard to duplicate in other orgs. (check out Hidden Value: How Great Companies Achieve Extraordinary Results With Ordinary People.)

    Connecting to an org’s unique interesting-ness (check that out on Flickr.com) and paying attention once you’ve nailed it, can be the heart of relationships building. Ultimately, it’s the truism, IMHO, it’s all about relationships. Why wouldn’t B2B = B2C be the same?

    • JT Pedersen November 10, 2010 at 10:53 am

      Hello Deb,

      Appreciate your comment. I agree, “it’s all about relationships.” For most of my professional career, whether in Support, Consulting, or Sales, I’ve openly admitted that in most cases 5% of what got done was of my own direct effort. 95% of a project’s efforts came from who I knew to engage and their willingness to contribute.

      Cheers,
      JT…

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